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Contraceptives

The following contraceptive services are available at Fargo Cass Public Health:

  • Abstinence or postponement of sexual activity: We support and encourage those who choose not to be sexually active.
  • Oral contraceptives or birth control pills: We carry many different brands of pills; or if you have insurance that covers contraception, we will be happy to provide you with a prescription to take to your preferred pharmacy after your exam.
  • Diaphragm and cervical caps: These are both barrier methods of birth control which are inserted before intercourse.
  • Condoms: A condom is a barrier method that also protects against many STDs. It should be used with spermicide to prevent pregnancy.
  • Contraceptive injection: Depo-Provera, also known as “the shot” is given every three months. It is convenient and very effective.
  • Hormonal implant: Nexplanon is a small rod that is inserted under the skin of the upper arm. It is considered very effective and lasts for three years.
  • Intrauterine device: The Copper T 380A, also known as the Paragard IUD, lasts for 10 years, acts as a spermicide within the uterus, and is ideal for women who prefer a nonhormonal method. The Mirena and Liletta IUD’s last for 5 years and can be beneficial for heavy periods. All IUDs can be removed if a pregnancy is desired prior to the expiration date.
  • Vaginal ring: Nuva Ring is a comfortable and flexible ring that is about two inches in diameter and used to prevent pregnancy. You insert the NuvaRing into your vagina once a month. NuvaRing stays in place for three weeks. During that time, it will slowly release a low dose of hormones that are needed to prevent pregnancy.
  • Natural family planning & fertility awareness information: We are able to provide information on this method and offer referrals to instructors for formal education. This method requires both partners to actively participate.
  • Sterilization: Tubal ligations and vasectomy services are not provided at Fargo Cass Public Health.
  • Emergency contraception pills: Provided up to five days after intercourse, but is best taken within three days, (72 hours), after unprotected intercourse. It decreases the chance of unintended pregnancy up to 89%, but is not intended to be used as a regular form of birth control. Emergency contraception pills are offered when a condom breaks, a pill is missed, or other times where there is a higher risk for an unplanned pregnancy.